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20121109
20121109
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
.m. eastern on the economy. that issue of the economy directly touches on the dysfunction in washington that americans said they hate. they went to bed election night hoping to fix that. speed really matters here. in just seven weeks the bush tax cuts expire, automatic spending cuts agreed to by both parties kick in. we call it the fiscal cliff and even though it's more like the fiscal steep slope it could do some very bad things to the economy. concerns about rolling down it or falling off it or whatever you want to call it have made markets nervous and credit rating agencies and economists of all stripes are warning about the consequences of not hammering out a deal in time. politicians in both parties, they've been sending out mixed signals ever since the election. on the one hand they're talking about common ground. take a look. >> we want our children to live in america that isn't burdened by debt. that isn't threatened by a warming planet. >> the nation as you know is at a critical point. at a time like this, we can't risk partisan bickering and political posturing. >> if there's
is over, it's time for washington to get in gear. do something about it. this fiscal cliff business could affect just about every single one of us, and you can bet there's plenty going on behind the scenes. this past hour we heard from the president in the east room of the white house basically announcing he's inviting leaders from both houses of congress and from both political parties to meet with him at the white house next friday. just a couple of minutes ago, we heard the president say he's open to compromise and open to new ideas, but there's one point the president is sticking to -- higher taxes for people making higher incomes. take a listen. >> i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000 aren't a asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> two hours before we saw the president, we saw the house speaker, republican, john boehner, said quote, everything on the revenue side and on the sp spending side has to be looked at but when it comes t
't heard from him since he returned to washington yesterday. we were told though by the white house this evening he'll make a statement on the fiscal cliff tomorrow but as far as what we know right now the administration says the president has already laid out his plan. it's a plan he says would cut the deficit by $4 trillion over the next ten years. it's also a plan those, that we've told you before doesn't add up. so something has to give. and someone needs to take the helm. last night here on "outfront" we tried to find out from chris van hollen what the president's role would be on the fiscal cliff. >> that remains to be seen exactly who will be the negotiate or negotiators. the white house has to be engaged. the president will make clear as he did in his acceptance speech last night we need to compromise. i think the president will be directly involved. >> directly involved but not clear what his role would be. will the president take the lead? here's the thing. americans want answers soon. today i overheard a major democratic fundraiser and lobbyist ben barnes saying this to a
the senate. >> white house correspondent brianna keilar is live from washington, d.c. for us this morning. brianna, speaker boehner seemed to be offering the president on olive branch earlier this week when he talked about the possibility of increasing revenue. but here he's taking a hard stance against tax increases. what does that say about the chances of a compromise? >> well, it may actually sound kind of like it's splitting hairs. but it's really two different things where he's talking about increasing tax rates. he says he's not okay with that. but he would be maybe okay, maybe amenable to increasing revenue. to bringing in more tax dollars, because there is a difference. and what he's saying is part of a chorus of conciliatory language that we're hearing from democrats and republicans on the hill. listen to more of what john boehner said in that interview. >> -- talk about all kinds of things we may disagree. i'm the most reasonable, responsible person here in washington. the president knows this. he knows that he and i can work together. the election's over. now it's time to get t
correspondent brianna keilar is live for us this morning from washington. john boehner was the guy who said he didn't think a lame duck congress could do big things. what can be done in the next, what did i say, 53 days? >> well, maybe finding some sort of stopgap measure. some sort of framework on tax reform, soledad. i think that's the goal here. the fact is, house republicans and president obama and senate democrats, they don't really have a choice. they have to do something, and that became very clear yesterday when the cbo put out a report showing that if the country goes over the fiscal cliff you're looking at economic calamity. you're looking at unemployment ticking up, perhaps two points. you're looking at a recession next year. so, also listen to the conciliatory language that we're hearing from the hill and that we may be hearing from president obama when he speaks here at the white house this afternoon. listen to what john boehner also said about being reasonable. >> we can talk about all kinds of things we may disagree on. i'm the most reasonable, responsible person here in washing
of representatives before leaving to become the head of the woodrow wilson center for scholars here in washington. suzanne kelly, thanks very much. just a while ago the white house released this written statement from president obama. let me read from part of it "by any measure david petraeus has made our nation safer and stronger. today, i accepted his resignation as director of the central intelligence agency and i am completely confidence that the cia will continue to thrive and carry. let's talk a little more about what's going on, the breaking news. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is standing by. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr is standing by. and our chief political analyst gloria borger is standing by. gloria, let me start with you. you just spoke with some people up on the hill. what are they saying? >> i just spoke with diane finestein. she calls this a tragic story for a human being. she says people may start saying he's a scapegoat for benghazi and the controversy in benghazi. she says that is absolutely false. she said i know what the personal story is here
of washington, i just think about you. i think about what you guys are going to do and that's the source of my hope. that's the source of my strength and my inspiration. and i know that -- i know that you guys aren't going to disappoint me because i've already seen who you guys are and you all are just remarkable people and you lifted me up each and every step of the way. all right? thank you, guys. [ applause ] >> remarkably candid and emotional president barack obama there. incredible video in many ways. governor deval patrick of massachusetts is co-chair of the obama campaign. i stumbled across that about an hour ago. somebody tweeted it. >> how about that. >> and i just watched it in its entirety and i found it incredibly moving. i have to say. putting aside whose side you're on, who you voted for, whatever, to see a president of the united states being that raw, that emotional with his campaign volunteers and to see barack obama openly weeping at one stage, very unusual, very moving. >> well, it is. i hadn't seen it before, either, piers, and it does i think reveal something i have unders
. everyone would be hurt. washington has to get its act together. >> okay. i'm an optimist. if i wasn't, i would cry. christine romans, thank you. >>> there's one thing standing between your wallet and that fiscal cliff. of course, it's the politicians. a few days after a bitter round of elections, can the president and republican lawmakers really find compromise? house speaker john boehner says he's ready to talk. >> talk about all kinds of things we may disagree on. i'm the most reasonable, responsible person here in washington. the president knows this. he knows that he and i can work together. now the election is over. now it's time to get to work. >> brianna keilar is at the white house. so, brianna, what do you expect president obama to say in this afternoon's remarks? >> reporter: carol, i think this is really going to be him sort of setting the scene and explaining to the american people what is at stake here, some of the things that christine outlined. we know that yesterday the cbo, congressional budget office put out a report saying that really the stakes here, that you could se
would get a resolution to the debt limit earlier than we did too, so faith in washington doing the right thing is a little bit low, but it does sound like from the conversation you just had with jessica that everybody is taking it quite seriously. >> talk specifically about the tax cuts that are going to expire. how much are most americans probably going to end up paying in increased taxes? >> well, it all depends because the reason this is a fiscal cliff is it's not a plan. ates bunch of stuff that came together at the same time that when it all expires at the end of the year will have this net effect of making people pay more money. so it's hard to tell because president obama wants the tax cuts to expire for everybody but only for the rich, so everybody else gets an extension. the republicans say everybody has to get it, so we're fighting over the 2% highest income earners who will see an increase in their taxes, but basically tax rates will go from a low of 10% to a high of 36% right now to a new system where the lowest would be 15%, and the highest would be 39%, which, by the way, i
. . >> reporter: but they are more than ready to start building up again, just as soon as the other washington settles down, and gets back to work. tom foreman, cnn, washington, virginia. >> it's a beautiful town. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me today. cnn "newsroom" continues right now with ashleigh banfield. >> thank you, carol. so nice to see you. and nice to see you, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield. it's 11:00 on the east coast, 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. and leave it to congress to engineer what they call a solution that sets up an even bigger crisis. the so-called fiscal cliff that's now only 52 days away was supposed to be just a threat. an incentive for lawmakers to get their gear on and make some tough choices a year ago. well, now those choices are going to fall to a newly re-elected president, and a lame duck congress. and the prospects? well, the president plans to talk about those prospects in his first public post election comments scheduled for about two hours from now at the white house, and that's exactly where we have positioned cnn's brianna keilar sta
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)